The WaterStove Newsletter
Short to-the-point articles for homeowners considering investing in a WaterStove
Written by: Mike Thompson  publisher of the 
WaterStove Directory

 

WaterStove
Newsletter

Issue 2
May  2006

1)  Energy and Fuels - A simple explanation
         Fossil Fuels, Organic Fuels, Solar, Electricity
2) 
Where WaterStoves fit in the home heating Big Picture         
3)  The typical WaterStove owner
4) 
Heating Terms: Conduction, Convection and Radiation
                         Topics for next month's Newsletter
 
     
Go to the WaterStove Newsletter homepage
 
Go to the WaterStove Directory
 
 
 

 

 
 

In our last Newsletter we mentioned several topics that would be discussed in this month's newsletter. Well, we have made some adjustments and those topics will be covered in future Newsletters. One of the reasons for this adjustment is because Turbo Burn submitted to us an interesting explanation of energy and the different types of fuels available to the consumer. This is educational and we wanted to share it with you.

 
     
     
           1)  Energy and Fuels - A simple explanation  
 

E
N
E
R
G
Y

 
Fossil Fuels
The remains of plants, animals and microorganisms that lived millions of years ago.

Crude Oil
These are the common fuels created from the processing of Crude Oil

Liquefied Petroleum Gas - LPG - Methane, ethane, propane, butane
Gasoline - Fuel for internal combustion engines
Diesel fuel - Used as Fuel Oil for heating homes or as diesel engine fuel
Lubricants - Motor oils, hydraulic fluids, greases, etc.

Natural Gas

Also known as Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LP Gas)
Deposits are found underground (usually associated with oil fields) and require processing to remove unwanted gasses.
The Natural Gas used in homes is almost pure methane gas.

Coal

Coal is a readily combustible black or brownish-black sedimentary rock primarily composed of carbon. Often sulfur is present.
   
Organic Fuels
From renewable resources

Biomass
Solids to be burned for heat

Biomass is the stored energy in organic materials made from plants and animals. Some examples of biomass fuels are wood, crops and manure.

Biomass is a renewable energy source because we can always grow more trees and crops, and waste will always exist.

Ethanol
Gasoline additive

Also known as Grain Alcohol - Ethanol is made by fermenting and then distilling starch and sugar crops -- maize, sorghum, potatoes, wheat, sugar-cane, cornstalks, fruit and vegetable waste.
A little more expensive to produce than gasoline. Pure grain alcohol is rated at 106 octane. Is used to boost the octane in gasoline and is safe for most vehicles. Gasoline has up to 10% ethanol (E10).

Biodiesel
Diesel fuel additive

Biodiesel is the name of a clean burning alternative fuel, produced from domestic, renewable resources. Biodiesel is the end product after glycerin is chemically removed from fat or vegetable oil.
Biodiesel contains no petroleum, but it can be blended at any level with petroleum diesel to create a biodiesel blend. It can be used in compression-ignition (diesel) engines with little or no modifications. Biodiesel is simple to use, biodegradable, nontoxic, and essentially free of sulfur and aromatics.
Fuel-grade biodiesel must be produced to strict industry specifications in order to insure proper performance. Biodiesel will gel in very cold temperatures, just as the common # 2 diesel does. Blends of 5% biodiesel (B5) or less have virtually no impact on cold flow. Higher blends are adequately handled with the same fuel management techniques as #2 diesel.
   
Solar

There are two methods
of capturing energy
from the sun

Using the sun's radiant energy to heat water in snaking tubes on a building's roof. This hot water can be used for domestic purposes such as showers, dishes and laundry or can be used to heat a home through heat transfer devises.
Using the sun's radiant energy to energize special photo cells which, in turn, creates electricity. This is called 'Photovoltics'. Electricity must be used immediately or stored in battery cells.
   
Electricity
Primary electricity generation in the United States: Coal 50%, Nuclear  20%, Natural Gas, 18%, Hydroelectric 7%
Consumers can generate electricity with windmills, paddlewheels in moving water and solar photovoltics. Surplus electricity can be sold back to the local power company, stored in battery cells or used to heat water which can be stored for future demand.
     
 
 
 
WaterStove tie-in:   All forms of energy listed above (except gasoline and ethanol) can
                                     be used to heat the water in a Premium WaterStove.
 
 
 

  Download the entire Turbo Burn Energy Information Sheet

BACK TO TOP

 
     
 
 
     
  2)  Where WaterStoves fit in the home heating Big Picture   
 
     
  PRIMARY HOME HEATING OPTIONS  
 
TYPE ENERGY SOURCE HEAT DISTRIBUTION
 
 
 
 
Furnace Gas, Oil, Wood/Coal Forced air duct network
Heat Pump Ambient heat, Electricity Forced air duct network
Electric        Heaters Electricity Forced air duct network,
baseboard
Boilers

Gas, Oil, Electricity,
and Wood

Wood Burning Boilers
are also called
WaterStoves

Forced air duct network,
Hydronics (radiators,
baseboard, radiant panels,
in-floor tubing). Boilers can
also supply domestic hot
water.
 
     
     
 

SECONDARY HOME HEATING OPTIONS

 
 
TYPE ENERGY SOURCE HEAT DISTRIBUTION
 
 
Solar
Sun Hot water for Hyudronics
Fireplace
Cord Wood Radiant and local fan
Space     
   Heaters
Gas, Oil Local fan
Electricity Radiant Panels, convection panels and heating elements with a local fan
 
 

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  3)  The typical WaterStove owner  
     
 
Lives rurally or in the country

Wants to heat with the least expensive fuel available

Wants independence from the big oil companies

Has access to inexpensive or free fuels (wood, waste oil, etc.)

 
     
 
 
     
  4)  Heating Terms: Conduction, Convection and Radiation   
     
 

There are only three ways to transfer heat

 
     
  Conduction
Conduction Heat is when heat energy is passed from a material of high temperature to another with a lower temperature. Examples: Using a stovetop burner used to heat a frying pan or laying on a warm waterbed to get warm.
 
     
  Convection
Convection Heat is when heat energy is transferred between a solid and a fluid (liquid or air). Forced Convection is when a fan or pump moves a fluid over a hot or cold object. Natural Convection is when cool fluids create currents as they move toward warm solids.
 
     
  Radiation (thermal)
Thermal Radiant Heat is the infra-red energy given off by a hot object that is absorbed by another. The open space between the two objects is not necessarily heated. Examples: The sun heating the earth and a fire in a fireplace heating the people in front of it.
 
 

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  Coming in the June WaterStove Newsletter  
 

 

 
 
 

We will try again to cover these topics:
     How to build a perfect fire
     The importance of the right insulation
     Using solar energy and electricity with a WaterStove
    
Current EPA and local government rulings
          and more

 
 

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BACK TO THE WATERSTOVE DIRECTORY

 
 
 
 

Thank you for reading the WaterStove Newsletter.
Suggestions and comments to this Newsletter are welcome.
Unfortunately,  time constraints will allow me to personally respond to very few emails.
Mike@OmniM.com

 
 
 
 

This Newsletter is sponsored in part by the following businesses:

 
 

 

 
 
 
Northwest Alternative Energy
  .
 
     
 
 

NCSS
North Coast Sales & Services, Inc

 
 
     
 
 
 

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